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Thutmose IV called it the tekhen waty or 'unique obelisk.' It was transported to the grounds of the Circus Maximus in Rome by Emperor Constantius II in 357 AD and, later, "re-erected by Pope Sixtus V in 1588 at the Piazza San Giovanni" where it is today known as the 'Lateran Obelisk.' Thutmose IV was buried in the Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV43, but his body was later moved to the mummy cache in KV35, where it was discovered by Victor Loret in 1898.An examination of his body shows that he was very ill and had been wasting away for the final months of his life prior to his death.After completing the restoration of the Sphinx, he placed a carved stone tablet, now known as the Dream Stele, between the two paws of the Sphinx.

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Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV, Thothmes in older history works in Latinized Greek; Ancient Egyptian: /ḏḥwty.ms/ Djehutymes, meaning "Thoth is born") was the 8th Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt, who ruled in approximately the 14th century BC.

His prenomen or royal name, Menkheperure, means "Established in forms is Re." Thutmose IV was born to Amenhotep II and Tiaa but was not actually the crown prince and Amenhotep II's chosen successor to the throne.

Due to the absence of higher dates for Thutmose IV after his Year 8 Konosso stela, Like most of the Thutmoside kings, he built on a grand scale.

Thutmose IV completed the eastern obelisk first started by Thutmose III, which, at 32 m (105 ft), was the tallest obelisk ever erected in Egypt, at the Temple of Karnak.

In addition, two necropolis seals from Abydos show the name in a unique way: While the chisel is shown conventionally where the catfish would be expected, there is a symbol that has been interpreted by several scholars as an animal skin. Narmer is often credited with the unification of Egypt by means of the conquest of Lower Egypt by Upper Egypt.

Although highly inter-related, the questions of “who was Menes? While Menes is traditionally considered the first king of Ancient Egypt, Narmer has been identified by the majority of Egyptologists as the same person as Menes.

On a mud sealing from Tarkhan, the symbol for the Tjay-bird (Gardiner sign G47, a flapping fledgling) has been added to the two symbols for ″Narmer″ within the serekh.

This has been interpreted as meaning “Narmer the masculine”, suggested that the extra sign is not part of the name, but was put inside the serekh for compositional convenience.

He probably was the successor to the Protodynastic king Ka, or possibly Scorpion.

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