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The words are contrasted in Hosea ( in Christian Bibles), where God speaks to Israel as though it is his wife: "On that day, says the Lord, you will call [me] 'my husband' (ish), and will no longer call me 'my master' (ba'al)." A wife was also seen as being of high value, and was therefore, usually, carefully looked after. The descriptions of the Bible suggest that a wife was expected to perform certain household tasks: spinning, sewing, weaving, manufacture of clothing, fetching of water, baking of bread, and animal husbandry.

The niddah laws are regarded as an intrinsic part of marital life (rather than just associated with women).

Together with a few other rules, including those about the ejaculation of semen, these are collectively termed "family purity".

This involves observance of the various details of the menstrual niddah laws.

Orthodox brides and grooms often attend classes on this subject prior to the wedding.

According to the Talmud, and later rabbinic writers, if the husband was absent or refused to do these things, a rabbinical court should arrange the wife's funeral, selling some of the husband's property in order to defray the costs.

If the husband and wife were both taken captive, the historic Jewish view was that the rabbinic courts should first pay the ransom for the wife, selling some of the husband's property in order to raise the funds.

He is obligated to provide for her sustenance for her benefit, in exchange he is also entitled to her income.

However, this is a right to the wife and she can release her husband of the obligation of sustaining her and she can then keep her income exclusively for herself. The Bible itself gives the wife protections, as per Exodus , although the rabbis may have added others later.

After erusin, the laws of adultery apply, and the marriage cannot be dissolved without a religious divorce. Marriage obligations and rights in Judaism are ultimately based on those apparent in the Bible, which have been clarified, defined, and expanded on by many prominent rabbinic authorities throughout history.

Traditionally, the obligations of the husband include providing for his wife.

Note that we are following the Jewish calendar for these events (and not the Gregorian calendar which is at times 150 years at odds with Jewish computations). Rabbi Ken Spiro, originally from New Rochelle, NY, graduated from Vassar College with a BA in Russian Language and Literature and did graduate studies at the Pushkin Institute in Moscow.

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