Beechlawn farmhouse dating

By 1906 it was owned by Robert Thomas Carew (jun) and valued at £70. This house was the home of the Ormsby family in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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In 1786 Wilson refers to it as " the beautiful seat of Thomas Ormsby".

In 1938 the Ormsbys sold Ballinamore to a Scottish order of nuns, the Order of St John, who used the house as a school.

Bary notes that Charles O'Connell is said to have built it in 1833 around the time of his marriage to Katherine O'Connell, daughter of the Liberator.

The family were later obliged to leave the property due to financial difficulties. Situated on the Neville estate this house was built by the Baily family in the mid 19th century. At the time of Griffith's Valuation, there is no house with a substantial valuation in the townland, which was the property of "Bernard Kelly, a minor, in chancery". Comyn, Parish Priest in 1837 and by John Singleton who held from William Gabbett at the time of Griffith's Valuation.

Catherine Cantillon was also resident in the townland at Courtstown Cottage Grid Ref W774 720. Lewis records Thomas Sadlier junior as the proprietor of Ballinderry "on which a house was about to be erected". James Demspter was noted as the proprietor at the time. In 1906 Percy Gethin owned the property then valued at £22. It is not marked on the later 25-inch map, suggesting it was no longer operational in the 1890s. At the time of Griffith's Valuation John Skerrett held the lands in fee when the house was only valued at £2. Ballingarrane was originally leased and then purchased in the late 18th century by Solomon Watson, banker of Clonmel. Bradshaw occupied the house in 1837 and John Mulcahy in the mid 19th century when the buildings were valued at £25 and held from Solomon Watson.

By the publication of the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map in the 1890s the latter property has become known as Courtstown House. Occupied by the Saunders family from at least the 1770s. Thomas Sadlier held the property in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation when the buildings were valued at £29. By the time of Griffith's Valuation it appears to be the mill manager's house, occupied by William Egan and held from Timothy Hogan, part of a building complex valued at £97, known as Santa Cruise Mills. He built Summerville House which later became known as Ballingarrane. The Watsons occupied the house again in the second half of the 19th century and family members were still resident in the late 20th century.

The latter property is labelled "in ruins" on the 25-inch Ordnance Survey map of the 1890s. In 1837 Lewis describes this house as a "handsome modern mansion surrounded with young and thriving plantations". Marked on the first Ordnance Survey map and situated on the outskirts of Limerick city this house was occupied by Edmund Palmer at the time of Griffith's Valuation when it was valued at £23 and held from Patrick O'Shea. Bence Jones states that the house was built in 1827 and was sold to the African Missionary Brothers circa 1908 by Lieutenant Colonel Llewellyn Blake of Ballinafad and Cloghballymore, county Galway. The Irish Tourist Association File states that the house was donated to the African Missionary Brothers by Colonel Blake and that a new wing was added in 1932. A branch of the Molony family appear to have occupied Ballinahinch for some time in the 18th century.

John Moloney held Ballinaboy House in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation, when it was valued at £40. A house occupied by William Scully and held by him in fee at the time of Griffith's Valuation. William Scully (born 1821) of Ballinaclough was the fifth son of Denys Scully of Kilfeakle. Occupied by Cornelius O'Callaghan in 18 and by his son Charles George in the mid to late 19th century. By 1906 Ballynahinch mansion house valued at £45 was in the possession of the Gore family. Ballinamona was the home of the Murphy family in the 19th century, occupied by William Murphy in 1814 and in 1850. Toler and occupied by Newton Short in the mid 19th century.

Occupied by Denis O'Conor in the 1850s, held from Theobald Dillon and valued at £6. In the 1940s the Irish Tourist Association survey refers to it as being occupied by F.

Dorman, retired engineer, and that it was the oldest occupied castle in Éire. A mid 19th century house, home of the Morris family.

It appears that, in the nineteenth century, a house was built adjoining the original tower house as, in 1840, the Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to Ballinard Castle, a gentleman's seat in the townland of Friarsgrange.

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